India has one of the lowest telecom tariffs in the world, but lower tariffs apparently do not guarantee good call quality, and many consumers have reported issues such as poor call clarity, voice breaks and call drops.

Consumers say call quality has deteriorated in the past year.

According to LocalCircles online polling, 35 percent of the citizens say one in four calls drop, and 21 percent say one in two calls drop. Consumers said that call drops had increased over the past few months as telecom operators moved their networks from 2G or 3G to 4G.

LocalCircles conducted surveys to ascertain consumer perceptions when it came to call drops and call clarity across the country. Polls were conducted across 200 districts and they received more than 12,000 votes.

The first poll asked citizens what percentage of their mobile phone calls dropped or had a connection issue.

In response, 21 percent said over 50 percent of their calls had issues, 35 percent said 20-50 percent of their calls had issues, 33 percent said up to 20 percent of their calls had connection issues, and only 11 percent said they did not face any issues.

Last year, TRAI had issued stringent rules for telecom companies who failed to meet voice quality benchmarks.

The rules prescribed a maximum penalty of up to Rs 10 lakh per circle. In the second poll, 20 percent of the citizens said that while speaking on the phone when they had a bad connection, the call drops after more than a minute. Thirty-one percent said it dropped after 30-60 seconds, 21 percent said it dropped within 30 seconds, and 28 percent said it did not drop automatically at all.

Consumers also said that call drops had increased over the past few months as telecom operators moved their networks from 2G or 3G to 4G but were not investing enough in their network capacity.

Citizens said that telecom service providers should ensure optimum quality levels in voice calls and should be held responsible for the plunging service levels. – New Indian Express


Perspective

Bharat exn

Communicatia

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